Journal Articles

Journal Articles

Henry, D. (1999). Resilience in maltreated children: Implications for special needs adoption.  Child Welfare, 78(5), 519-540.

Children in the child welfare system face renewed issues of loss as they enter adoptive placements. Every move is a loss and an exercise for the child in establishing the perception of a “safe” environment. Resilient children who have been abused develop coping skills to adapt to their abusing “unsafe” environments. When these children become part of an adoptive family, these coping skills need to be recognized as providing important cues to the child’s world, rather than as challenging behaviors. The author deconstructs the words of resilient children into five themes that can help provide access into the children’s world, a fresh viewpoint from which to assess the adopted children’s reactive behaviors, and a foundation on which an adoptive relationship can be built.

Henry, D. (2001). Resilient Children: What they tell us about coping with maltreatment, Social Work in Health and Mental Health: Practice, Research and Progress,34(3-4):283-98.

Using a grounded theory qualitative research, this study explored the strategies used by children to cope with abusive home environments. Through a series of three interviews, a group of adolescents and child care professionals were asked their perceptions regarding protective factors of resilience. These were then categorized into common patterns that emerged as five themes showing a progression of skills used by adolescents who were maltreated as children. These themes are: loyalty to parents, normalizing of the abusive environment, establishing a sense of safety through a perception of invisibility to the abuser, self value, and a future view. This research adds important knowledge to the body of practice skills in working with abusing families. Those children who have developed methods to cope provide us with valuable tools to assist other children who may continue to live in abusing environments.

Henry, D. (2005).  The 3-5-7 Model: Preparing children for permanency.  Children and Youth Services Review, 27, 197–212.

How do we ensure that youth who have been traumatized by life experiences are ready for permanency, as they navigate the uncertainty of where and with whom they will be engaging in relationships? How do we support their actualization of lifelong relationships? How do we support their actualization of lifelong relationships? How do we reduce the number of youth with mental health diagnoses related to multiple out-of-home placements? This article discusses a relational practice methodology, the 3-5-7 Model, which is a promising practice and core approach that supports permanency work with older youth.  Various permanency types, including the absence of

Henry, D., & Manning, G. (2011). Integrating child welfare and mental health practices: Actualizing youth permanency using the 3-5-7 Model.  American Humane Association Journal, 26(1), 30-48.

How do we ensure that youth who have been traumatized by life experiences are ready for permanency, as they navigate the uncertainty of where and with whom they will be engaging in relationships? How do we support their actualization of lifelong relationships? How do we support their actualization of lifelong relationships? How do we reduce the number of youth with mental health diagnoses related to multiple out-of-home placements? This article discusses a relational practice methodology, the 3-5-7 Model, which is a promising practice and core approach that supports permanency work with older youth.  Various permanency types, including the absence of permanency, mental health symptoms unique to foster youth, and relationship barriers, will be identified. Programs implementing the model are highlighted, including those pursuing family finding and engagement, and youth and family team meetings. Finally, limitations and suggestions for future directions in using the 3-5-7 Model are discussed.

permanency, mental health symptoms unique to foster youth, and relationship barriers, will be identified. Programs implementing the model are highlighted, including those pursuing family finding and engagement, and youth and family team meetings. Finally, limitations and suggestions for future directions in using the 3-5-7 Model are discussed.

 

Other Publications

Implementation, science and fidelity measurement: A test of the 3-5-7, Model™. Social Service Series No. 8. (2017, July) Las Vegas: The Lincy Institute at the University Nevada, Las Vegas by Denby, R., Tudor, J., Henry, D., Wolfe, S., Gomez, E., & Alford, K. A.  

Abstract: Children and youths engaged with the child welfare system can experience grief and loss as a result of trauma, broken relationships, and inadequate attachments. Interventionists are often challenged to implement effective strategies that help youths to reestablish trusting relationships and to promote overall psychological well-being. A 5-year federal demonstration project funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children’s Bureau, guided by an implementation science model, sought to increase well-being in youths age 12–21 who were involved in the child welfare system. The 3-5-7 Model™, a strengths-based approach that empowers children, youths, and families to engage in grieving and integrating significant relationships, was studied. A fidelity system was created in order to test the model. Important lessons about implementation science guided the work of the demonstration project. Although definitive conclusions could not be reached, several indicators of psychological well-being were found to be associated
with high levels of fidelity to the 3-5-7 ModelTM. Suggestions for future research are offered.

Child Welfare Information Gateway. (2013). Preparing Children and Youth for Permanency. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children’s Bureau.

This bulletin, developed by Child Welfare Information Gateway in partnership with Darla Henry, Ph.D., discusses services for children and youth to address their readiness and preparation for permanency. We look at what has previously been considered adequate preparation as well as current practices and those in development to more effectively ensure that children and youth are ready for permanent family relationships, including both legal and relational permanency (permanent relationships with caring adults).

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